Twin Peaks Art – No Baloney, Magic, or Psycho Mumbo Jumbo

“I don’t want any baloney, magic tricks, or psychological mumbo jumbo.”

no-baloney-magic-mumbo-jumbo

Source: Pinterest

Source: Twin Peaks Art – Timeline Photos

 

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Potential dangers of publishing Aurora theater shooter’s personal notebook

joker-auroraLoren Coleman, author of the Copycat Effect, tweeted:

Potential dangers of publishing Aurora theater shooter’s personal notebook

… Forensic psychiatrist Dr. Park Dietz said the release of this notebook to the public can do only harm.

“No good can come out of that kind of unfiltered dissemination of someone’s inner-most thoughts,” Dietz said.

Dietz does work for  the FBI’s Behavioral Analysis Unit and has participated in many high-profile cases, including those involving the assassination attempts on President Reagan and on Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords, more than 25 serial killer cases, the Unabomber case, and the Columbine High School shootings.

“…The (notebook’s) content will cause some readers, if only a small proportion, to say, ‘this guy is like me’. And when that happens in that small fraction of the readership, that identification…with the killer emboldens them and encourages them to consider similar action.”

Later in the article…

Following the mass-murder in the Aurora, Colo., movie theater on July 20, 2012 that killed 12 and left 70 injured, there were multiple reports of potential copycat cases.

July 21, 2012: A man in Turnpike, Maine arrived armed with a gun to an afternoon showing of “The Dark Knight Rises”. When arrested, police found an assault rifle and several handguns, 10,000 rounds of ammunition and newspaper clippings about the Aurora theater shooting.

July 22, 2012: A man in Norwalk, Calif. made threats at a showing of “The Dark Knight Rises” and verbally alluded to the Aurora shooting. Witnesses reported that the man said, “I should go off like in Colorado. Does anybody have a gun?”

July 25, 2012: A New York man who worked for the NYC Department of Education was arrested after telling police he was obsessed with the Colorado movie massacre. Authorities found photos of the Aurora theater shooter “all over (the man’s) desk”. The man told police that he sympathized with the killer.

July 26, 2012: A Maryland man went to his workplace, called himself “a Joker” and threatened to “shoot the place up.” At the man’s home police found 25 guns, including semi-automatic rifles and pistols. Prince George County Police said it was an attempted copycat of the Aurora theater shooting.

July 31, 2012: A Minnesota man was arrested after making repeated references to “the Joker” and the Aurora theater shooting, telling police he understood the shooter’s motives and planned to have his own killing spree. copycat-effect-loren-coleman

Loren Coleman believes that because the notebook was released nearly three years after the massacre occurred, the likelihood of people being inspired by the writings is decreased. Coleman authored the book, “The Copycat Effect: How the Media and Popular Culture Trigger the Mayhem in Tomorrow’s Headlines”.

“…There is less danger that the James Holmes’ notebook will have a widespread copycat impact,” Coleman said. “That is, as long as the words of Holmes don’t become a media phenomena and go virtual via social media.”

 

See also:

 

 

Editor’s note:  CU News Corps, like many media outlets, has published the notebook in its entirety. Reporter Lo Snelgrove presents a different perspective on sharing this piece of evidence with the public.  By Lo Snelgrove CU News Corps  CENTENNIAL, Colo. — Today, the Arapahoe County Court released a photocopied, PDF version of the Aurora theater …

Source: Potential dangers of publishing Aurora theater shooter’s personal notebook – CU News Corps

Disney workers arrested in child sex stings

Missed this headline back in July…

Dozens of Disney workers arrested in ‘To Catch A Predator’-style child sex stings

 

  • CNN investigation found at least 35 Florida employees arrested since 2006
  • They visited police trap house after explicit chats with undercover officers
  • Workers included ticket seller, concierge, tour guide trainee and security
  • Polk County Sheriff’s Office now wants all child workers polygraph tested
  • But Disney insisted the workers arrested made up just 0.01% of its staff

 

At least 35 Disney World employees have been arrested since 2006 over alleged child sex offences, an investigation has revealed.

The suspects included a ticket seller, a concierge and a trainee tour guide at the Florida resort – and even a night shift manager accused of watching child porn at work while he wrote a church sermon.

Police caught many in stings modelled on the TV show To Catch a Predator, with undercover officers receiving explicit messages before the suspects agreed to meet at a home rigged with cameras.

The latest round of arrests last week netted another 13 suspects, including four who at some point worked at the sprawling Magic Kingdom.

Disney has insisted the theme park is so large, with around 70,000 employees, that those arrested represent only 0.01 per cent of people it has employed since 2006.

‘The undercover detective told Spencer he was a 13-year-old boy. Spencer initiate sexually explicit messages to a person he thought was a 13-year-old boy, including mutual oral sex.

‘The suspect travelled to the undercover location and was arrested.’

He faces five separate charges, as does 40-year-old Allen Treaster, who worked as a concierge at Disney’s Animal Kingdom.

Police arrested Treaster two weeks ago on suspicion of sending explicit messages to an officer he thought was a 14-year-old boy.

 

Disney workers arrested in ‘To Catch A Predator’-style child sex stings |Daily Mail Online.

 

JonBenet Ramsey: How the Investigation Got Derailed — and Why It Still Matters

Alan Prendergast

Above credit: Brian Stauffer

Priscilla and her husband, Fleet White Jr., had been with John and Patsy Ramsey just ten hours earlier. The Ramseys and their two children had come to the Whites’ house for Christmas dinner. Nine-year-old Burke Ramsey had played Nintendo games with seven-year-old Fleet III, while best friends JonBenét and Daphne White, both six, had played in Daphne’s room. There had been nothing remarkable about the evening, but now the Ramseys were making desperate calls for help.

Fleet and Priscilla hurried to their friends’ house. The police were already there, and more friends, summoned by Patsy, were on their way. But Patsy was inconsolable. She sat on the floor, clutching a crucifix and praying to Jesus. “They have my baby,” she moaned.

She’d woken up that morning, she told detectives, to find a three-page handwritten note on the spiral staircase leading from the children’s bedrooms to the first floor. The garrulous note, claiming to be from a “small foreign faction” and signed “S.B.T.C.,” demanded $118,000 for the return of JonBenét, who was missing from her room. Patsy had screamed for her husband, then dialed 911.

Fleet and Priscilla had never seen Patsy so hysterical, flailing and collapsing in sobs. John Ramsey wasn’t known for displaying emotion — Fleet, who’d done a lot of sailing with him in rough weather, had admired his calm in even the worst storms — but he looked distraught, too.

While arrangements were under way to assemble the cash demanded, the Whites did what they could to be useful. Recalling how his own daughter had once gone missing only to be found hiding under her bed, Fleet took a quick tour of the basement, looking for hiding places. He and John collected Burke Ramsey from his room, and Fleet drove him to the Whites’ house, to keep him away from the awful situation.

As the day dragged on with no word from the kidnappers, several of the visitors got a glimpse of a police photocopy of the ransom note. It was a melodramatic epic, full of odd lines from movies (“Don’t try to grow a brain”) and squiggly, palsied lettering, as if the writer was trying to disguise his handwriting.

Priscilla was struck by the taunting tone of the note, which was addressed to “Mr. Ramsey.” She wondered who could hate John Ramsey that much, to put him through this. She believed it had to be someone familiar with the layout of the Ramsey house, a three-story, much-modified Tudor with a labyrinthine basement; Priscilla herself had lost her way more than once the first few times she’d visited.

Around one in the afternoon, Boulder police detective Linda Arndt suggested that Fleet take John Ramsey around the house to see if they’d missed anything — probably just to give the anxious father something to do. After inspecting several rooms in the basement, Ramsey headed toward a storage room known as the wine cellar. It was a door Fleet had opened on his earlier tour, but he hadn’t found a light switch and hadn’t gone inside. Moving a few feet and seconds ahead of Fleet, Ramsey opened the door and snapped on the light.

“Oh, my God,” he said. “Oh, my God.”

 

See also: Westword’s JonBenet Ramsey Archive

Continue to keep reading “JonBenet Ramsey: How the Investigation Got Derailed — and Why It Still Matters.”

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JonBenet Ramsey: How the Investigation Got Derailed — and Why It Still Matters | Westword.

 

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